Do-It-Yourself Articles

Anchor Sleeves

Anchor sleeves are more commonly called sleeve anchors.  Sleeve anchors are used to fasten an object to masonry.  Sleeve anchors are made up of 4 parts: stud, sleeve, nut and washer and are sold completely assembled.  Sleeve anchors are one of the most versatile types of masonry fasteners due to their use in concrete, brick, block as well as their availability in numerous head styles which meet most application requirements.

Applications
Sleeve anchors are perfect for use in most masonry materials, solid concrete, hollow block, cinder block, solid brick, hollow brick and mortar joints.  The expansion of the sleeve can extend over a long distance as compared to other types of expansion anchors that expand at a given point.  Depending on the specific sleeve anchor chosen, they can be used for light to medium duty fastening.

Size – diameters and lengths
Sleeve anchors are available in six diameters, with each diameter coming in a variety of lengths to meet most application.  The diameter sleeve anchor to use for any application is determined by the diameter of the hole in the fixture and the holding value required or specified by an engineer or manufacturer.  The larger the diameter then the greater the opportunity for higher holding values.  The length of any sleeve anchor used for any application is determined by adding the thickness of the material being fastened to the minimum embedment depth of the diameter of sleeve anchor being installed.  Each diameter has a minimum distance for installation in the base material in order to obtain minimum holding values.  The hex, round and acorn headed sleeve anchors length is measured from underneath the head.  The flat headed sleeve anchor is measured as an overall length.

Head Styles

The standard and most popular head style is the hex washer head, which is available in all diameters and lengths. The acorn and round headed sleeve anchor is only available in the 1/4”.  The flat headed sleeve anchor is available in both the 15/16” and 3/8”.  Each head style is designed to enhance different applications.  The flat headed sleeve anchor is countersunk and used for door frame installation in block and thresholds in concrete.  Acorn and round headed styles have a low profile and are usually used by electricians for mounting junction boxes to block or concrete.  In the majority of applications, the hex headed sleeve anchor will suffice as it sits flat against the top of the surface of the material being fastened.

Technical Information

Each diameter of sleeve anchors has different requirements in regards to the hole size, bolt size minimum embedment and other considerations.  In general, the diameter of the hole to be drilled in the masonry is equal to the diameter of the sleeve anchor being installed.  The bolt size of all sleeve anchors is one diameter smaller with the minimum embedment increasing as the diameter of the sleeve anchor increases. More information is included in the following chart:

Anchor

Hole

     Bolt

Minimum

Fixture

Wrench

Required

Diameter

Diameter

Diameter

Embedment

Hole*

Size**

Torque***

1/4”

1/4”

3/16”

1-1/8”

5/16”

3/8”

5 ft/lb

5/16”

5/16”

1/4”

1-7/16”

3/8”

7/16”

8 ft/lb

3/8”

3/8”

5/16”

1-1/2”

7/16”

1/2”

15 ft/lb

1/2”

1/2”

3/8”

2-1/4”

9/16”

9/16”

25 ft/lb

5/8”

5/8”

1/2”

2-3/4”

11/16”

3/4”

50 ft/lb

3/4”

3/4”

5/8”

3-3/8”

13/16”

13/16”

90 ft/lb

• Minimum hold diameter
• For hex and aorn head
• Maximum torque required

Installation Requirements

When installing sleeve anchor into masonry material, a hole must first be drilled.  The hole must be drilled using a hammer drill with the drill set in the hammer and rotation mode. The hole can be drilled with the item in place because sleeve anchors are designed for installation through fixtures and into the masonry while the item being fastened is in place.

  • Drill the hole through the item being fastened and directly into the base material. The hole must be drilled using carbide tipped bit that meets ANSI standards B94, 12-77 and used with a hammer drill set in the hammer and rotation mode.
  • Drill hole 1/2” passed the depth that the sleeve anchor will be embedded into the masonry.  Make sure that the hole is deep enough to insure that the anchor, once set, will meet minimum embedment requirements.
  • Clean out the hole of all dust and debris using compressed air, a blowout bulb, wire brush or vacuum. 
    Take the sleeve anchor and make sure that the nut and washer are flush with the surface of the top of the threaded stud. 
  • Insert the sleeve anchor through the hole in the fixture and into the hole in the masonry.  Tap with a hammer until the washer and nut are tight against the surface of the item being attached. 
  • Using your fingers, tighten the nut until finger tight.  Then use the correct wrench to turn the nut 2 to 3 full turns, or turn until minimum torque value for the diameter of sleeve anchor is reached.

 



 

As with any anchoring project, it is important to keep safety in mind and follow instructions carefully. Always remember to wear safety goggles, handle all tools with extra care and follow all technical specifications. This article is meant to serve only as a basic explanation of concrete fasteners. Always refer to manufacturer's instructions or consult a contracting expert during any anchoring project.

Article Written By:
Mike Pistorino, Vice-President Operations

 

 

 

 


Concrete Fasteners, Inc. has over 40 years of experience selling concrete fasteners. We can ship out one box or a whole pallet of concrete anchors. Our products are of the highest quality... "your satisfaction is guaranteed". We ship all orders the same day the order is received.