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Concrete Anchors & Fasteners is Our Specialty   Questions? Contact Mike   

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Troubleshooting Sleeve Anchor

Troubleshooting Sleeve Anchor

Purchase Sleeve Anchors

Problem: Sleeve anchor spins in the hole when trying to tighten

Trouble Shooting Tips:

  • Make sure that the correct diameter of carbide tipped bit is being used.
  • Use a hammer drill to drill the hole in the base material, and check that it has been switched to the hammer and rotation mode.
  • Check the bit to make sure that it meets ANSI standards.  An ANSI standard bit will ensure proper hole tolerance.

Problem: Setting the nut to the top of the stud

Trouble Shooting Tips:

Before installing a sleeve anchor, make sure that the nut or, in the case of the round or flat head, is threaded on the last few threads.  This will protect the threads from damage during installation.

Problem: Round or flat head sleeve anchor does not set

Trouble Shooting Tips:

If the anchor does not catch once pounded in and the head is turned clockwise, unthread the head a couple of turns, pound pack into the base material and then turn the head  several more times.

Problem: Sleeve anchor protrudes into hollow base material

Trouble Shooting Tips:

Sleeve anchors are designed for use in hollow base materials such block or brick.  It is critical that the length of the sleeve anchor chosen does not  protrude into the hollow section.  The sleeve anchor needs to be expanded against the base material to achieve holding strength.

Problem: Nut size for sleeve anchor is smaller than designated size

Trouble Shooting Tips:

The size of the sleeve anchor is designated as the outside diameter of the sleeve anchor or the diameter of the hole that must be drilled in the base material.  The nut is threaded onto the threaded stud, which fits inside the sleeve and is smaller than the designated diameter.  For example, a 3/8” sleeve anchor has a 5/16” nut.

Problem: Determining the correct fixture hole size for the sleeve anchor diameter

Trouble Shooting Tips:

The hole in the fixture or item being fastened must be slightly larger than the designated diameter of the sleeve anchor being installed.  If the sleeve anchor will be installed through the fixture hole while the item is in place, then the hole in the item must be larger.  The designated diameter is larger than a true measurement. For example, a 1/2” sleeve anchor will not fit through a hole in a fixture that is 1/2”, so the minimum diameter in the fixture needs to be 9/16” for a 1/2” sleeve anchor.

Problem: Choosing the correct expansion anchor for a variety of materials

Trouble Shooting Tips:

Sleeve anchors are the most versatile type of expansion anchor on the market today.  They can be used in all masonry materials, such as brick, hollow block, mortar joints, solid concrete and hollow concrete.

Problem: How to measure sleeve anchors’ lengths

Trouble Shooting Tips:

The acorn, hex, and round-headed sleeve anchors lengths are all measured from underneath the head.  The flat sleeve anchor is measured as an overall length including the head.  The reason is that the measurement equals the length of the sleeve anchor that will penetrate the item being fastened and the base material.  The acorn, hex, and round-headed sleeve anchor all have heads that sit above the surface of the item being fastened.  The flathead sits flush with the surface of the item being fastened, and the total length of the flat-headed sleeve anchor is below the surface of the item being fastened.

Problem: Choosing the correct sleeve anchor to use indoors

Trouble Shooting Tips:

The zinc plated sleeve anchor is used for indoor dry environments and should not be used in wet, moist environments because they will gradually rust, which may cause the holding values to deteriorate.

For indoor environments, the sleeve anchors made from 304 stainless steel should be considered because that they do not rust.  They are more expensive, but will not rust like the standard zinc plated sleeve anchor.